Simposium 2014 - English

Imprimir

EDiSo 2014 Symposium - Seminars

. Publicado en Simposium 2014 - English

Simposium584Seminar 1: Discourse, movements and social networks
Coordinators: Adil Moustaoui and Luisa Martín Rojo

Participants in this seminar will analyse various dimensions of how discourse is shaped in and about networks and current social protest movements. From an interdisciplinary perspective, we will address issues such as: the shaping of communicative practices in these social and political movements; the role of multilingualism in participation and internationalisation; the transformation of urban and political space by means of communicative practices; communication in social networks; and discourse (media, political, parliamentary) about social movements.

Proposals addressing the following primary, but by no means exclusive, topics of this seminar will be particularly valued:

  • How do the communicative practices of social movements relate to the values, ideologies and societies for which they struggle?
  • What role does multilingualism play at the heart of these protest movements?
  • How do communicative practices contribute to the construction of urban space and the extension of the political space?
  • What are the key discursive representations and counter-representations of these movements?
  • What role have social networks played with respect to the issues raised in the above questions?

The seminar discussion will respond to these issues and others as they arise.


Simposium584Seminar 2: Discourse, humour and gender
Coordinators: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo. and Olga Cruz Moya

The goal with this seminar is to shed light on the pragmatic nature of humour, primarily understood as a discursive manifestation. Humour can be explained through various linguistic perspectives, such as relevance, cognitive linguistics, or the General Theory of Verbal Humour. At the same time, various psychological explanations have been offered for its use (relief theory, superiority theory, incongruity theory). Along these lines, we will address some of the ways in which humour might be understood. In addition, the use of humour varies according to gender, suggesting a marked gender difference with respect to these behaviours. Indeed, humour is a pragmatic matter that affects social variables such as age, socioeconomic level and gender. Several empirical studies have shown differences in the use of humour across the gender variable, also taking into account factors such as sexual identity, stereotypes, and the conceptualisations of these that are deployed in the use of humour.

The following primary, but by no means exclusive, topics are suggested:

  • Can humour be analysed from a linguistic perspective?
  • How is such a pragmatic matter influenced by the genres and texts from which it draws inspiration?
  • What social, cognitive and cultural differences can be observed in its use?
  • Can a particular community teach/learn how to use humour?
  • Do men and women use humour in the same way?
  • How is humour involved in the construction of gender identity?
  • Does attention to the variable of genre reveal differences among the planned humorous discourses (jokes, monologues, parodies, etc.)?
  • If humour in spontaneous conversation is a strategy, how does gender influence the way it is used?
  • Does it make sense to consider other characteristics, such as participant social equality, age and class?
  • Are there social, cultural, anthropological, cognitive, biological or psychological variables that support the idea of differential linguistic behaviours regarding humour for men and women?

The discussion is open to these issues and others that may arise during the seminar. Presentations that explore social, cognitive or cultural aspects related to the central topic of the linguistics of humour are welcome.


Simposium584Seminar 3: Discourse and health
Coordinators: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo. and Antonio Bañón Hernández

The goal of this seminar is to explore some of the fundamental lines of enquiry concerning the analysis of discourse around health and illness. Based on a variety of methodological perspectives, analysis of diverse interactions taking place in social health care contexts will be one of the preferred topics. The ways in which individuals with particular pathologies are discursively represented in the media, artistic texts, and legal, educational and business discourses will also be addressed.

Proposals addressing the following primary, but by no means exclusive, topics of this seminar will be particularly valued:

  • How does the media treat health and illness?
  • How are different illnesses depicted in the media?
  • What cultural differences influence media discourses around health and illness?
  • How does the media portray people with disabilities?
  • Power, knowledge management and decision-making: How are these articulated in patient-doctor interactions?
  • The discourse of health campaigns: Ideology and audience construction.
  • The value of personal narratives in redefining illness and constructing identity.
  • Are there identifiable gender differences in the narratives of illness?
  • How has the role of the patient developed in relation to emerging discourses about health and illness on the World Wide Web?

The discussion is open to these issues and others that may arise during the seminar.


Simposium584Seminar 4: Discourse, multilingualism and migrations
Coordinators: Clara Keating, Susana Martínez Guillem and Mohamed El-Madkouri

The objective of this seminar is to analyse discourses of and about migrations and situations of multilingualism associated with mobility and contemporary transnational movements. From an interdisciplinary perspective, presentations will address issues such as linguistic policies and ideologies, regimes of use, the distribution and legitimation/delegitimation of multilingualism, and relations between local languages and the languages of mobility or migration.

The goal, therefore, is to pay attention to discursive representations of migration, mobility, migrant collectives and their languages in public spaces, as well as concrete linguistic practices in social and institutional spaces, within and beyond host societies.

Notwithstanding other possible topics, presentations that address the following issues will be particularly valued:

  • What discursive representations and linguistic practices arise as a consequence of new migratory movements and other phenomena associated with new economies?
  • What values and ideologies influence the recognition, investment in and management of the multilingual repertoires of migrant language speakers in situations of mobility, and what are the social implications for these speakers and for the collectives they represent?
  • How do communicative and linguistic practices contribute to the emergence of networks among speakers in situations of migration or mobility, social networks and formal and informal support organisations?
  • How does the temporality of migratory movements (whether they are short-, medium-, or long-term) affect the organisation of multilingual regimes, and how are these negotiated in concrete spaces of action?
  • What implications do interactions among language, race/ethnicity, class, gender, religion and/or nationality have on the organisation of multilingual regimes?

The seminar discussion will respond to these issues and others as they arise.


Simposium584Seminar 5: Discourse and society
Coordinators: Gloria Álvarez Benito and Carmen Gregori-Signes

This seminar is open-topic. It will feature contributions on issues related to the field of Discourse and Society, such as: discourse and the media, political discourse, and discourse and education, among others. The goal is to share lines of research and analytical proposals, as well as the most relevant perspectives on the topics addressed.

Attachments:
Download this file (EDiSo_2014_CALL_FOR_PROPOSALS_ENG.pdf)CALL FOR PROPOSALS[ ]187 kB